Management of Feline Orofacial Pain Syndrome (FOPS) – with Interventional Pain techniques 

cat after FOPS from NDSR

Feline Orofacial Pain Syndrome (FOPS) is a condition associated with episodes of severe oral discomfort. Pain in FOPS often recurs and is poorly responsive to first-line treatments.  Affected cats often display exaggerated licking and chewing movements, especially after eating or grooming. Pawing at the mouth is common, and more severe cases will present with tongue…

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Canine Atlantoaxial Instability

Canine atlantoxial instability radiograph image

The craniocervical junction is probably the most complex anatomical structure within the spine. It allows a wide range of motion of the head while protecting the spinal cord from compressive injury. The atlantoaxial spinal motion unit is a common site of craniocervical instability. Failure of the atlantoaxial supporting structures can result in dramatic neurological deficits…

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Feline EPI; are we missing these cases?

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a well-recognised syndrome in dogs, with clearly defined breed predispositions (including German Shepherds, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Rough Collies, Chows) and clinical signs (diarrhoea in 95%, poor body condition in 87%, polyphagia in 52%,). EPI should often spring to mind when the patient has diarrhoea, poor body condition +/- accompanying…

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Maximising Success with Intestinal Suturing

Enterotomy and enterectomy are commonly performed procedures in practice due to the frequent occurrence of gastrointestinal foreign bodies. Although these are common procedures, good surgical technique is essential as the consequences of dehiscence are devastating with the development of septic peritonitis. The mortality rate associated with septic peritonitis can be as high as 50%. Dehiscence…

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Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC)

Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) or negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a simple but effective method to promote rapid wound healing. It has been shown to be effective for management of large, complex, acute wounds as well as chronic wounds that have failed to heal by conventional methods. It is also commonly used to stabilise…

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Haemoabdomen in Dogs

The most common cause in dogs is acute non-traumatic haemoabdomen secondary to malignant neoplasia causing splenic rupture. Other causes include trauma, iatrogenic following surgery (e.g. ovariectomy) or diagnostics (e.g. FNA), coagulopathies or torsion of the liver or spleen. Abdominocentesis will reveal blood that does not clot. The PCV of the blood will be similar to…

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Intestinal Biopsies

Indications for biopsy Full thickness intestinal biopsies may be taken to investigate gastrointestinal signs. Dehiscence of the sutures can lead to the life-threatening complication of septic peritonitis and so these risks need to be relayed to the owners. Biopsy technique Full thickness biopsies are recommended. Biopsies are performed either using a skin biopsy punch (6…

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The Diagnosis of Portosystemic Shunts

Hepatic vascular abnormalities can be divided into congenital and acquired portosystemic shunts (PSS), hepatic arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and microscopic hypoplasia of the portal system (portal vein hypoplasia; previously called microvascular dysplasia). Single congenital portosystemic shunts are the most common of these anomalies and generally consist of a single extra or intrahepatic vessel that communicates between…

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Principles of Wound Management and Basic Skin Reconstruction

In this webinar Nicola will discuss how to manage challenging wounds. From initial decontamination to methods of debridement, all traditional and cutting edge methods will be discussed. Although some wounds can be closed primarily, some require more advanced techniques so some basic flaps will be described. Principles of Wound Management and Basic Skin Reconstruction

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Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (BOAS) Update

The trend for flat-faced dogs has grown significantly in the last decade. Selective breeding for flat-faced characteristics has led to an increased incidence of upper respiratory tract obstruction and subsequent respiratory distress. Whilst the length of the skull is reduced, the volume of soft tissues remains the same. Affected dogs have to increase their respiratory…

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